TSO Relevant Results


No WP Result description Benefits Innovation content Contact partner
1 2 A model for analyzing the economic viability of the DREAM concepts from different electricity market actors’ perspectives: combination of the techniques “Business Model analysis” (actor perspective, qualitative assessment; see White Paper Business and Economic Modeling) and “KPI  analysis” (use case perspective; qualitative and quantitative assessment;) to reach insights over different dimensions of SGAM (Smart Grid Architecture Model). See Deliverables D2.1 – D2.2 The solution introduces transparency regarding the economic changes and helps to evaluate the advantages of DREAM solutions to all parties that are involved in the DREAM market design The solution combines business model analysis (actor perspective) and key performance indicator analysis (use case perspective) in order to allow an adequate coverage (breadth and depth) for a smart grid project evaluation.

SEI

Francisco Ramos

2 2 Validated model for profitability assessment (data analytics) of DER/RES involvement on the Day-ahead wholesale market. See Deliverables D2.1 – D2.2 Business Analysis,  barriers reduction toward DER large roll-out The output of the analysis claims that investing in DER by means of flexibility having reduced marginal cost of activation appears as the most suitable solution to pay-back the flexibility infrastructure by an involvement on the wholesale market. Doing so, the flexibility stays moreover still available for the supply of advanced ancillary services at the benefits of the System Operators.

ICCS

Aris Dimeas

3 2 Simulation tool: allows analysis of impact of price levels on user and producer behaviour and testing different pricing schemes and bid scenarios.See Deliverables D2.1 – D2.2 The managing entity could use this simple tool for ex post assessment of the impact of (smaller or greater) changes in the price levels on the behaviour of the entities, without having to solve a 4large-scale problem. This simple, yet transparent, tool quantifies the response of local resources to price signals. It allows for various pricing schemes to be tested, while taking into account the form of the local resources’ bid functions, which can also vary based on the type of day (e.g. weekday, weekend).

ICCS

Aris Dimeas

4 2 Model of the interdependence in the decision-making process regarding electricity prices and volumes of diverse entities connected to the distribution network. See Deliverables D2.1 – D2.2 The model facilitates the task of day-ahead management and functional integration of local resources connected to the distribution network by means of price signals. The decisions of the managing entity regarding the price incentives to be announced are optimized by taking into account the response of various local resources to these prices. This feedback assists the managing entity in making informed decisions regarding the prices.
Formulation of a bilevel programming problem

ICCS

Aris Dimeas

5 3 Qualification of PowerMatcher agent-based strategies to offer their momentary, primary process flexibility to current TSO and possibly future, DSO mediated imbalance markets as ramping power. This also is the first application of PowerMatcher technology in a large prosumer setting.See Deliverables D3.1 – D3.2 The strategy contributes to resolving conflicts between DSOs, TSOs and BRPs of using customer flexibility from the capacity and the energy viewpoint. Additionally, the bottom-up, autonomous way of delivering the flexibility adds to the usability within high DG-RES settings The solution uses an agent-mediated bottom-up approach with PowerMatcher based on micro-economic theory. Agents express their primary process status in a generic way by a bid curve. This is in contrast to most research directions that use a DSO-mediated top-down approach. Such an approach might interfere with primary process electricity consumption/generation requirements from the prosumers’ primary process’ and BRPs’ requirements for electricity consumption/generation

TNO

Rene Kamphuis

9 3  Classification and pre-emption of flexibility offers:
Classify validated flexibility offers by cost OR by efficiency (based on sensitivity) and pre-emption of flexibility offers to solve voltage deviations and current congestions. See Deliverables D3.1 – D3.2
 Help the DSO to use in the best economical way the different flexibility opportunities in LV and MV grids, in order to prepare network congestion management  ·     Pre-processing before operation
·     Classifying validated flexibility opportunities
·     Pre-empting flexibility offers for local network constraint management and assessing the flexibility technical need

GINP

Raphael Caire

11 3 Mapping from market trades to operational configurations: flexibility forecast is improved; the influence of communication failures and user uncertainties are dealt with. See Deliverables D3.1 – D3.2 For DSO: improve control robustness and reliability
For customer: secure and reliable supply
Distributed optimization models are used to assess improve forecast precision.
The key parameters for reliability are identified and their sensitivities are evaluated.

ICCS

Aris Dimeas

12 3 Practical implementation of the BEDW-traffic light concept to coordinate the grid operation and the market interaction. See Deliverables D3.1 – D3.2 Practical investigations in field tests and insight for future projects; Contribution to political discussion about future adaptions of grid codes Allows the coordination between markets and grid operation

UNI Kassel

Martin Braun

15 3 Offer frequency support flexibility for the TSO
DSO can propose frequency support flexibility for the TSO by relying on small scale dispatchable loads. See Deliverables D3.1 – D3.2
Propose frequency support at low cost to stabilize the network and thus help integration of Renewables
Dynamic guarantee of availability of linear frequency-controlled reserve
Fast load shedding capability
Standard IEC 61850
Multi-DERs compliant
·     Creating frequency drop control with DER
·     Aggregate and coordinate flexibilities in LV network compliant with AMI

GINP

Raphael Caire